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Posts Tagged ‘esthetician’

medical aesthetician

Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy that explores and studies the nature and form of beauty, along with the creation and appreciation of beauty.

An Esthetician is a skin care specialist, that has been formally educated and trained in skin health and beauty. To become an Esthetician, one must obtain a specific amount of credit hours, typically around 600. Educational requirements, rules and regulations do vary by state. After graduating, an Esthetician will need to pass state board exams, which include a written and practical exam, to obtain a license. An Esthetician may work in a salon, spa, private studio, on location, med-spa or in a medical practice such as dermatology or plastic surgery. An Esthetician may also work as a makeup artist, as an educator or in sales. Many Estheticians obtain additional degrees, certifications or training. This may include things like laser certification, cosmetic tattooing, lash extensions, electrolysis, massage therapy, nursing, oncology esthetics, and holistic approaches.

Estheticians typical provide treatments such as facials, chemical peels, hair removal, makeup application and some body treatments. Estheticians may also be referred to as a facialist, because they specialize in facials. Estheticians are the go-to people when choosing skin care products, they study ingredients and skin care products extensively and can create a complete skin care regime appropriate for your skin. Although an Esthetician is trained to recognize some skin conditions, they do not diagnose or treat medical skin conditions. Many skin lesions closely resemble each other and need to be diagnosed by a dermatologist. Conditions like eczema, psoriasis, allergies or skin cancers, require medical attention.

Esthetician or Aesthetician
Esthetician and Aesthetician may be used interchangeably and both are correct, however the spelling on a license may differ by state. In Arizona, my license reads “Aesthetics” while my text book is Esthetician. Generally, the Esthetician spelling is used when describing someone who works in a spa environment, while Aesthetician is used to describe someone who works in a medical environment. There is no solid rule on which spelling must be used, both are correct.

Holistic Esthetician
The term “Holistic Esthetician” is not recognized by the State Board of Cosmotology as a specific license, it does however describe an Esthetician who uses a holistic approach, emphasizing the importance of the whole person, including mind, body and spirit. Holistic esthetics is typically associated with treatments and remedies that are more natural or integrative alternative therapies. Holistic Estheticians usually work with products that contain natural and/or organic ingredient. Some schools offer specific holistic-based esthetician training programs, however there is little difference compared to a general esthetician training, so many Estheticians opt for post graduate holistic eduction and may even obtain a Holistic Skincare Practitioner Certification. There are plenty of Estheticians who do not specifically identify themselves as a holistic provider, but incorporate some holistic approaches.

Medical Aesthetician and Laser Technician
An Aesthetician that works in a medical environment may have additional training or certifications, they may be referred to as a Medical Aesthetician, Paramedical or Clinical Aesthetician, Master Aesthetician or Aesthetician, CLT (Certified Laser Technician) or CMLT (Certified Medical Laser Technician).

Although the terms Medical Aesthetician and Paramedical Aesthetician are used to describe an Aesthetician who works in a medical setting, these terms are usually not recognized by most state boards and do not necessarily guarantee that a provider has met any additional requirements. A “Master Aesthetician” is generally someone who has obtained additional training and credit hours to include laser treatments and aesthetic treatments typically offered in a medical setting. Some states like Utah offer a Master Aesthetic license after completing 1200 credit hours plus additional apprenticeship hours. The majority of states, including Arizona require formal training and additional credit hours to obtain a Laser Technician certification through the state Radiation Regulatory Agency. This requires a minimum amount of credit hours to include didactic and practical hands on training. Usually, specific training and additional hours are required for each modality added to your certification. Laser technicians must work under the supervision of a medical director. In California a laser technician must be an RN or PA and in New Jersey only a Medical Doctor may perform laser treatments.

A Career in Aesthetics
If you are considering a career in the aesthetic industry, research the requirements required by your state. Do a little self-reflection and consider what aspect of the aesthetic industry you feel most passionate about and what things you might want to avoid. For example, if you can’t handle the sight of blood you probably shouldn’t work for a plastic surgeon. If your a “Little Miss Chatterbox” like myself, you should avoid the tranquil day spa. Are you obsessed with make-up, does your heart drive you to work with cancer patients, do you take a holistic approach to life, are you a social media genius or do you have the talent to be an educator. Would you prefer to work in a luxury spa environment, a medical practice, work in management or work as a sales representative. Do you have the discipline to be self employed or the entrepreneur spirit it takes to open your own spa or create a new product. Maybe your a trail blazer, who will create your own niche in the market. Evaluate the job opportunities in your area and inquire about the qualifications employers look for. Not everyone who goes to esthetic school will find success in the industry, but there are ever-growing possibilities. Consider Anastasia Soare, a woman who came to America and took a “waxing job” as an Esthetician. From her brow-shaping method, she built the global beauty empire Anastasia Beverly Hills.

Choosing an Esthetician
Not all Estheticians collectively agree on the best products, treatments or approach, so you should look for an Esthetician that fits your personal goals. If it is important to you, to have an all natural approach, then look for an Esthetician that is like minded. If you want to relax and be pampered in tranquil ambiance, then you may prefer a day spa setting. If you are seeking corrective or more aggressive result focused treatments, then a med-spa or medical practice may fit you best. When selecting an Esthetician, be sure to ask about there experience and training. What ever your goals and personal style is, there is an Esthetician for you.

Read MoreJuly 9, 2017 10:36 pm - Posted by Kristy

Estheticians Networking

It is a rare individual who becomes successful without help. I am an aesthetician and laser technician who has been in the industry for nearly 17 years. Throughout my entire career, I have experienced the importance of networking with other skin care professionals. I began to network while still in aesthetic school, leading to a job offer, before I even got my license. At this stage in my career, I still appreciate being able to call or text other skin care professionals for advice. We should be networking throughout our careers. Networking with other industry professionals works to improve the industry as a whole.

Employment

It is not always what you know, but who you know! Networking with other skin care professionals is the best way to learn of employment opportunities and possibly gain an introduction, or even a recommendation. This is also true for those looking to hire.

Negotiating Income

A few years ago I was involved in a private aesthetic group, and one of the biggest topics that came up in the forums had to do with compensation and benefits. It is natural to not want to discuss our exact income, but when we open up about pay structure and benefits, we help each other to negotiate a better income and benefits package. It behooves us all to raise the standard income for our industry. According to the BLS, skin care specialists made a median salary of $29,050 in 2014. The highest-paid 10 percent in the profession earned $58,880, while the lowest-paid earned $17,680 that year.

Peer Input About Purchases

Adding new equipment, treatments, and product lines can be risky business. Vendor reps are in the business of selling their product, not giving impartial advice. Receiving input from others in the industry is invaluable. Anytime we are looking to add something new, I call other aestheticians that use that particular product or device, and gather their thoughts on it. This type of networking empowers us as aestheticians, in the same way online reviews empower consumers. Vendors will work harder to take care of us if they realize the value of our opinion among peers.

Know What Is Going On In The Industry

Networking has helped me to learn more about products, new treatments, and treatment protocols. I have learned about regulation changes in my state, as well as regulation differences in other states. I have also inquired about upcoming events, trade shows, training workshops, seminars, and on-line training.

Advice

Smart people surround themselves with smarter people. I don’t care how experienced, educated, or smart you think you are, you can always learn from an alternate perspective. Sometimes we have blind spots or get lost in our own ideas. In our industry, there is always a new study, a new treatment, new protocol, or new information, and it is impossible for anyone to know everything. I have attended many classes and workshops over the years and I ALWAYS find that someone will pick up on something I missed, and vise versa. If I attend a class, I will share what I have learned, and my aesthetician friends will share with me what they learned at another class. This sharing of information has been very helpful. Even the best aesthetician or laser technician will encounter a complication at some point and someone else may know just the solution to your problem. Even things like a challenging client or issues with co-workers can benefit from another perspective.

Referrals

None of us offer every service, or are experienced with every specific need. We all have our talents and limitations. Sometimes we are limited by our tools, and sometimes by our experience or training. Sometimes, we are even limited by location. I have had clients who have moved out of state, and they want to know if I can recommend someone. It is our job to do what best serves our client, even if it means referring them to someone else.

Doctors commonly refer patients to other doctors, even within their own specialty. Why should any of us have such an ego that we elect not to refer a client to another aesthetician, if we cannot provide what that client needs? If it is not ego, it is fear. We are fearful someone will steal our clients. It is shameful that we cannot trust each other. Are we all a bunch of thieves and back stabbing cheats? I don’t think so! It is possible to refer your clients to another aesthetician for a specific service or product and have them return to you as a regular client. I have a network of aestheticians that refer clients to me if I provide a service which they do not. If I know that a client was sent to me from another aesthetician, I will always speak well of who ever referred them. I will not try to steal that client, or sell them services, that I know the referring aesthetician can provide. I do this because I want that aesthetician to continue to refer clients to me. I also want to be able to refer clients to these aestheticians and trust they will not “bad mouth” me, or steal my client. We have established a mutual trust and respect for each other. Plus, it’s the right thing to do! Never pull a robbery when someone has trusted you with a referral.

Friendship

Having friends to trade services with and make you pretty is an industry benefit. Having friends with common interests makes life better. Having friends in the industry makes your work more fun and feel less like work. Having friends that you can learn from and trust makes you a better aesthetician.

Networking Tips

I recommend to start networking with people you already know in the industry, and branch out from there. You can network with vendor reps, educators, aesthetic providers (such as doctors and nurses), and obviously other aestheticians. Trade shows, training workshops, and seminars are all great networking opportunities. You can use social networking sites to find a local group. There are aesthetic groups and forums online, of which I will share a few links below. If you have found a networking group that you recommend, please share in the comments below.

NCEA
NASN
Medical Spa MD
Aesthetic Everything
The Skin Games
ASCP – ASSOCIATED SKIN CARE PROFESSIONALS

Read MoreSeptember 6, 2016 4:26 pm - Posted by Kristy

theskingames

The Skin Games is a national competition where Estheticians compete for the title of “Best Skin Care Profesional” or for those new to the industry “Best New Artist”.

I was excited to participate in the skin games, this year. It is great for Estheticians, like myself to have this platform to showcase our talents. It has also been a learning experience, to see the methods used by other professionals. After seeing all the treatment videos, I look forward to meeting the other Estheticians at the live show, this April. To up the cool factor, this years show will be hosted by Bobby Brown and Athena from “Ex-Wives of Rock”. Sharise Neil and Blue Dixon from “Ex-Wives of Rock” will also be at the red carpet event, that will be after the award show. You do not have to be a player or even an Esthetician to attend the live show, during the day there will also be an all day event with vendors, live demonstrations and beauty swag. What a great excuse for a girls trip, …. industry guys trip too. As a finalist in this years games, I hope to see some of my Esty friends at the live show.

How To Play

Estheticians may enter in the categories of Hyperpigmentation, Anti aging, Acne / Problematic Skin or Best New Esthetician. The catch is you have to abide by the laws governing the state of California. Regulations differ by state, and in many of the states outside of California, Estheticians do laser and energy based treatments if they have an additional certification or if they are a Master Esthetician. The good news is, for those of us who work in Medical Esthetics, there is an “OPEN” category where Estheticians can follow the scope of practice governed by your state rules and regulations. Medical Esthetics is such a huge part of our industry, with Estheticians working in med-spas or for dermatologists, plastic and reconstructive surgeons, even gynecologists. I have no doubt that expanding The Skin Games to include Etheticians in the med-spa industry will attract a lot of Estheticians to compete and draw a lot of exciting vendors to the live show.

Each player selects a model,puts together a treatment plan, then submits 8 short videos, one per week to document treatments. Players also submit before and after photos of model to show results. A panel of judges will determine the winner based on photos, treatment plan and results. Friends,family and clients can also vote for their favorite player, the “Peoples Choice” award.

The Live Show

The live show is in San Ramon, California on April 23rd. Players will be awarded during the live show. Before the show, Estheticians can enjoy the beauty festivities with treatment demonstrations and check out the vender booths from various skin care lines. This is also a good opportunity to socialize and network with other professionals in the industry. If you are at this years show, please stop and say hi to Kristy Harris.

www.theskingames.com

Read MoreMarch 16, 2016 11:08 pm - Posted by Kristy

skin-consultation

I can not tell you how many times I have been in the mall or a beauty store and heard a sales person give a shopper horrible advice on skin care. To the defense of the sales person, they probably are unaware they are giving poor advice, they are likely not trained skin professionals. Often the product they recommend cost just as much, if not more than the more effective cosmeceutical products used by skin professionals.

An in-depth consultation with an licensed Esthetician should be your first step to addressing aesthetic skin concerns such as aging. Even if you are just looking for professional advise on appropriate skin care to maintain your skin, a skin consultation is needed. Standing in the front office and talking to the office staff or even an Esthetician between appointments, does not cut it. Not everyone is qualified to give skin care advice, even the Esthetician can not give you the attention you need in 5 minutes. A full consultation is always the best way to go. We have put together a list of tips to help you get the most out of your skin consultation.

Select your Esthetician

An Esthetician is a skin care specialist, that has been educated and trained on skin health and beauty. They do not diagnose or treat medical skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, allergies or skin cancers. An Esthetician may work in a day spa, salon, med-spa or within a medical practice such as dermatology or plastic surgery. When selecting an Esthetician, be sure to ask about experience and training. Some Estheticians may have additional training or certifications to work in medical aesthetics. You should look for an Esthetician that fits your personal goals.

Be Prepared to Discuss Your Concerns

If you can help your Esthetician understand what you see, and what concerns you most, then they can better help you. We recommend you make a list of concerns and what you hope to improve. It may help to look in a mirror while creating your list. If you simply want to maintain your skin, we can help with that too. The more clear you are about your concerns, the more likely they will be addressed. You may have skin issues or signs of aging that do not bother you, your Esthetician does not want to offend you by suggesting that you improve something that you are content with. Estheticians understands that most people have a budget and we want to respect your money, so be sure to communicate the priority of your concerns.

What to consider:
Pigmentation Concerns Is your skin color even or do you notice irregular pigmentation such as Melasma, dark patches, freckles, age-spots, sun spots or pigmented scars.

Acne / clogged pores Do you have any cysts, pimples, black heads, white heads or clogged pores. Do breakouts correlate with menstral cyle or hair removal. How often do you break out.

Texture Is your skin smooth and even or does it feel rough or flakey. Does your skin look creapy, have fine lines or scars that are raised or depressed.

Vascular Issues Do you have Rosacea, broken capillaries, diffused redness or red spots. Do you flush easily?

Oil and Moisture Is your skin normal, oily, shiny, dry, tight and dry?

Aging concerns Do you have any lines, wrinkles, folds? Is your skin that lax or thinning. Is your facial volume plump and cohesive or do you see separation of the fat pads, hollowness of the face or under eyes, flat cheeks, or jowls? Do you have droopy or hooded brows?

Hair Even if you are only seeking skin treatments, let your Esthetician know if you experience unwanted hair, specifically facial hair and how you address it. Hair growth and hair removal methods may provide clues to skin issues. ( This applies to men and women) Some hair removal methods my be contraindicated to potential treatments or products. Estheticians specialize in hair removal methods, so they can provide you with or suggest the most appropriate hair removal methods.

Tell us what products you are using

Be prepared to talk to your Esthetician about the skin care products you have used in the past and are currently using. When filling out your consultation form, it is not enough to list a brand name or only including a couple products. We need a detailed list of the products you are using and it is even better if you bring the products in with you, so that we can read the ingredient list.

Not all skin care products or ingredients play well together, for example products with Benzoyl Peroxide can oxidize your topical antioxidants. Acne and anti-aging products usually active ingredients and if we mix too many, the skin may become very irritated. You may already be using something similar to what we would recommend and we do not want you to purchase something, if you already have it or something like it. Your Esthetician will try to work with your current products, when possible. Sometimes, however it may be necessary to start from scratch.

Tell us what you have done already

Think back to any cosmetic procedures or skin care treatments you may have had and make a list. Your Esthetician will need to know what procedures / treatments you have done. Some things should not be repeated too soon, while others my be contraindicated to each other. For example if you have had deep (full coverage) resurfacing procedures, your Esthetician will want to know because they can not be repeated too frequently. If you have recently had certain injectables, you may need to wait before having some procedures. If you have ever had any silicone injections or have you been on accutane, you need to alert your Esthetician.

Tell your Esthetician what you liked or did not like about the things that you have already done. If you had a good experience with something, that will provides a clue to how you respond to treatment. If you feel something did not work or you had a bad experience, we do not want to repeat that for you. Sometimes, your Esthetician may want to spend some time educating you on why you had that experience. Never assume anything is irrelevant.

Tell us a little more about you

Your Esthetician will want to know a little about your medical background and medications. Some medications may increase chance of bruising or cause photosensitivity. Do not forget to list any supplements or herbal treatments you may use. Remember to list any allergies, including food allergies, as some skin care products contain natural ingredients like pumpkin, papaya and pineapple. Medical conditions can effect how your bodies wound healing ability and how your skin responds to treatment. When listing medical conditions be sure to include any hormone therapy.

Your lifestyle and habits are important too. How do you exercise, are you on a restrictive diet, do you smoke, drink or use any other substance. We are not here to judge you, we need to take into consideration the variables that may influence how you will respond to treatment. If you have any special scheduling concerns, be sure to discuss them during your consultation.

Be clear on expectations

As you are discussing treatment options, be sure to clarify what you should expect. Often clients do not understand that they should expect some reaction with treatment or even some skin care products. Be sure you have an idea of what is normal and when you should be concerned. If you are having a treatment that involves any “down time”, your Esthetician will give you an idea of how long it will take to recover. Keep in mind, that this is just an estimated time frame. There are far too many variables that effect healing, it is impossible to predict exactly. It is also relative to what you consider to be “down time” and when it comes to your appearance being acceptable to return to work or social activities, everyone has different standards.

Before scheduling treatments, be sure you understand what typical results are. Often clients hear what they want to believe, expecting too much. Its tempting to hope that even if your Esthetician recommends a series of treatments, that you will be the exception. Sometimes we convince ourself that a non-surgical treatment will deliver a surgical result. We want to believe that one treatment can replace the need for others or that what we do at home isn’t that important. Try to keep your expectations realistic.

Consultation Fee

Be sure to find out about your consultation fee, often the consultation fee may be credited toward your first treatment. As a courtesy, many Estheticians offer a free consultation. This likely means they are not getting paid, so if you can not make your appointment, call to cancel or reschedule as soon as possible. A minimum of 48 hours prior to scheduled appointment is standard, this allows time to fill the space.

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Read MoreJuly 19, 2015 10:55 pm - Posted by Kristy

High Frequency is a tool that is used by Estheticians in facials and skin treatments. It is often used to treat or prevent acne skin lesions, as well as aid in healing. It is especially useful after acne extractions. If you have ever had a facial, there is a good chance your facialist used a hand held high frequency device to treat your skin.

High frequency uses a violet ray, however when it is passed through a neon gas the light will appear as red or orange. The mild oscillating electrical current passes through the glass electrode to the skin for a thermal effect. The method most commonly used by skin professional is known as the “direct current application”, where the electrode is applied directly to the skin or over a mask. When treating an acne lesion, your esthetician may also use a technique known as “sparking”, this is when the high frequency is held slightly away from the skin to create a gentle spark. Both methods are gentle and painless. The high frequency increases blood circulation and the dilation of underlying vessels also helps to eliminate toxins. When applied directly high frequency has a germicidal action, fighting acne-causing bacteria. Treatments only take a few minutes and are usually added into a facial or other skin treatments. High Frequency skin treatments are very gentle, many clients even find it relaxing.

Thank you for visiting Best of Both Worlds Az
You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and on our blog site
www.bestofbothworldsaz.com

®© All Rights Reserved.

Read MoreSeptember 20, 2011 3:19 pm - Posted by Kristy

It’s been all over the news, I am referring to the Esthetician who gave her eight year old daughter injections of Botox to treat “wrinkles”. She was motivated to do this to help give her daughter an advantage in pageants. As a mother and an Esthetician myself, I wanted to share my thoughts on this crazy story. It has already been said that she is sending the wrong message to her daughter. Lets face it, that message began with putting an eight year old in a beauty pageant.

Why Does An Eight Year Old Want Botox?

There has been discussion about why an eight year old would ask for Botox in the first place. As an Esthetician I can tell you that at that same age my son knew about many of the things we offer in the beauty industry, just from hearing me talk about it. I even remember him telling me that his teacher needed a blue peel, but for the most part he had no interest in esthetic treatments. I am sure that girls would naturally have a little more interest in esthetic and cosmetic treatments than boys, but certainly not anti-aging treatments. Just to state the obvious… children do not have wrinkles!

Mommy is an Esthetician????

The mother of the little girl is an Esthetician and claims it was her daughter that asked for Botox. As a mother and an Esthetician, I do not see how that justifies her actually injecting her daughter with Botox. My son once asked me to remove his cow lick with laser hair removal. I obviously refused and explained to him that although it would permanently rid him of his cow-lick, he would be left with a bald spot on the back of his head. He said, he would rather have a bald spot than a cow-lick. I promised him that he would feel differently later, and then changed the discussion to the pain involved. Now that he is a teenager, I know he is glad I didn’t honor his request. My first point is that children do not know what is best for them, thats why they have parents. My second point is, Estheticians have a professional responsibility, to educate clients about the benefits and risks of a treatment.

The Worst Esthetician Ever!!!

The little girl said she didn’t like wrinkles. Okay… that is fair, I don’t exactly like them either. I am going to be completely hypothetical for a moment, because I am obviously not in the business of treating or consulting children for cosmetic treatments. If I was consulting with this little girl, I would point out that she doesn’t have wrinkles and I would explain to her that children have a lot of collagen and elastin and that their skin cells turn over very fast. I would also explain that the facial muscles only become strong enough to create lines and wrinkles after many years and she could reconsider Botox in about 20 years. I would teach her that the best way to prevent wrinkles is to use a good sunblock every day. Other things she should do, is eat a healthy diet with a lot of fruits and vegetables, drink plenty of water, get enough sleep and exercise and never start smoking. I might even teach her how to properly cleanse her face, but thats about it. It is irresponsible as a skin professional to provide skin treatments that are unnecessary to anyone. I have to assume that either this esthetician doesn’t understand how the skin functions or has poor ethical and professional standards (or both). She is also working outside the scope of an Esthetic License, the only way she can inject Botox is under the direct supervision of a doctor, in which case the doctor can be held responsible for her actions. She stated that she does the injections her self, and purchases the Botox online. FYI- the internet is not a trusted source. After careful consideration, I am awarding this mom with the title of ” Worst Esthetician Ever”.

I am annoyed that this ridiculous story gives a bad reputation to Estheticians and Botox. The truth is there are “bad” Estheticians, which is why it is so important to find an Esthetician that excels in the field. I have to advocate for Botox, by saying that it is only intended for cosmetic use in consenting adults and in children to treat specifically indicated medical conditions, but not for cosmetic purpose. Botox is only sold to approved doctors, the woman in this case claims to have purchased it on line. As I have said many times before, just because you can buy something on the internet doesn’t mean you should.

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Read MoreMay 14, 2011 4:55 pm - Posted by Kristy