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Posts Tagged ‘skin cancer’

sunscreen

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month. The American Academy of Dermatology launched a campaign for Melanoma Monday, and Who’s got your back. The American Academy of Dermatology states that the most common place for melanoma is the back. Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer. Be sure to get your annual dermatology appointment to have your whole body checked for skin cancers and suspicious lesions. Also be sure you are applying your sunblock correctly. Sunscreen is safe and can protect your skin against skin cancer and premature aging. However, it is not as effective unless it’s applied correctly.

Follow these tips which were taken directly from the American Academy of Dermatologists website. AAD.org

Choose a sunscreen that has an SPF of 30 or higher, is water resistant, and provides broad-spectrum coverage, which means it protects you from UVA and UVB rays. Follow these helpful tips when selecting a sunscreen.
Apply sunscreen generously before going outdoors. It takes approximately 15 minutes for your skin to absorb the sunscreen and protect you. If you wait until you are in the sun to apply sunscreen, your skin is unprotected and can burn.
Use enough sunscreen. Most adults need at least one ounce of sunscreen, about the amount you can hold in your palm, to fully cover all exposed areas of your body. Rub the sunscreen thoroughly into your skin.

Apply sunscreen to all bare skin. Remember your neck, face, ears, tops of your feet and legs. For hard‐to‐reach areas like your back, ask someone to help you or use a spray sunscreen. If you have thinning hair, either apply sunscreen to your scalp or wear a wide‐brimmed hat. To protect your lips, apply a lip balm with a SPF of at least 15.

Reapply sunscreen at least every two hours to remain protected, or immediately after swimming or excessively sweating. People who get sunburned usually didn’t use enough sunscreen, didn’t reapply it after being in the sun, or used an expired product. Your skin is exposed to the sun’s harmful UV rays every time you go outside, even on cloudy days and in the winter. So whether you are on vacation or taking a brisk fall walk in your neighborhood, remember to use sunscreen. For more skin cancer prevention tips, see a board-certified dermatologist.

People who get sunburned usually didn’t use enough sunscreen, didn’t reapply it after being in the sun, or used an expired product.

Your skin is exposed to the sun’s harmful UV rays every time you go outside, even on cloudy days and in the winter. So whether you are on vacation or taking a brisk fall walk in your neighborhood, remember to use sunscreen.

And remember, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. To protect your skin, the American Academy of Dermatology recommends that everyone:

Seek shade when appropriate, remembering that the sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
( I may be one of the only parents who try and adhere to this time frame about 95% of the time. I will not allow my children to swim during this peek time when the suns rays are the strongest. I feel that it is just a better idea to wait until later in the evening to swim or spend extended periods of time in the sun.)

And remember, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. To protect your skin, the American Academy of Dermatology recommends that everyone:

Seek shade when appropriate, remembering that the sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, where possible.
Generously apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 30 to all exposed skin. “Broad-spectrum” provides protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays.

umbrella
Wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, where possible. ( and we are that family that is out at the lake wearing those long sleeved uv protective shirts)
Generously apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 30 to all exposed skin. “Broad-spectrum” provides protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. ( The ZO Skin Health line just came out with a face and body spray spf 50, and water resistant that I’m excited about!) oclipse-sun-spray-spf50

For more skin cancer prevention tips, see a board-certified dermatologist.

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Read MoreMay 5, 2015 11:11 pm - Posted by Stephanie

The eyelids are one of the most common places for skin cancer and the first place we see the signs of aging. Skin cancer in this area is especially dangerous and hard to detect. Luckily, there are products that can protect the delicate skin around the eye.

The Concerns

The eyelids are very susceptible to skin cancer and the aging effects of UV exposure. About 10% of skin cancers occur on the eyelids, which is kind of shocking when you consider that the face/head accounts for less than 5% of the total body surface area. There are many additional concerning factors regarding skin cancers on the eyelid. There is a significant risk for tissue damage to nearby vital ocular structures and even blindness. Tumors in this area can also spread into the nasal and orbital cavities (the area behind the eye). Let not forget that the skin of the eyelid serves to protect the eye and when that skin has to be removed we are presented with a host of issues such as preventing infection and reconstruction of the eyelid is very difficult. Early detection can be challenging because these tumors tend to grow inward toward the deeper layers of the skin and bone, before they are seen on surface of the skin. The appearance of this type of cancer varies and looks different than other types of skin cancers, making detection even more difficult. Reoccurrence of skin cancer on the eyelid is among the highest. It is important to take measures to prevent skin cancer, and become an established patient of a good dermatologist before you think you need one.

As if cancer was not enough, photo-aging of the eyelid is another concern. Photo-aging is a term used to describe sun damage and premature aging caused by UV exposure. Consider that the skin is a direct reflection of health and that sun damaged skin is not healthy skin. Photo-aging goes beyond vanity, it really is about skin that is not functioning properly or at a healthy state.Sun damaged skin will have lowered immunity against infection and impaired wound healing ability. Furthermore, UV rays age skin cells, damage DNA, break down collagen, elastin and damage pigment producing melanocytes. All of this equals unhealthy skin that is thin, lax (loose), with lines wrinkles and skin discoloration. There are products and treatments that can be done to improve these issues, but it will take time, money, and a little work.

Prevent the damage and reduce risk of cancer

The first line of defense is a broad spectrum sunscreen SPF 30 or more. The eyes and the skin around the eyes are sensitive to chemicals in sunscreen so you should look for a physical sunscreen, meaning the only two active ingredients are Titanium dioxide and Zinc oxide. I like Physical Eye UV Defense SPF 50 by Skin Ceuticals, it is a non-migrating, high protection sunscreen designed specifically for the upper and lower eyelids. This is a pure physical sunscreen that you apply like and eye cream. The formula is tinted to enhance tone, however it will nor provide coverage like a cosmetic. I like to say it’s tinted for a man. It blends right in and doesn’t settle into fine lines or make your eye area appear dry/cakey. the ceramics in it will nourish the skin, but I still recommend using your usual eye cream first then SPF.

For additional protection I recommend using a topical product with vitamin-C, every morning. While sunscreens absorb or reflect out UV radiation, antioxidants such as vitamin-C neutralize the UV rays. Photoprotective topical antioxidants work by the inhibiting the UV-induced biochemical changes that lead to photoageing and DNA mutations.

Studies show that sunglasses do help protect eyes from UV damage, however some UV light can still get to the eye area, depending on the type and style of sunglasses. Look for sunglasses with UVA/UVB protection and remember that sunglasses do not eliminate the need for sunscreen.

The Eyelids: Highly Susceptible to Skin Cancer / Skin Cancer Foundation
Thank you for visiting Best of Both Worlds Az
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Read MoreJune 8, 2014 8:15 pm - Posted by Kristy