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Posts Tagged ‘sunblock’

sunscreen

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month. The American Academy of Dermatology launched a campaign for Melanoma Monday, and Who’s got your back. The American Academy of Dermatology states that the most common place for melanoma is the back. Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer. Be sure to get your annual dermatology appointment to have your whole body checked for skin cancers and suspicious lesions. Also be sure you are applying your sunblock correctly. Sunscreen is safe and can protect your skin against skin cancer and premature aging. However, it is not as effective unless it’s applied correctly.

Follow these tips which were taken directly from the American Academy of Dermatologists website. AAD.org

Choose a sunscreen that has an SPF of 30 or higher, is water resistant, and provides broad-spectrum coverage, which means it protects you from UVA and UVB rays. Follow these helpful tips when selecting a sunscreen.
Apply sunscreen generously before going outdoors. It takes approximately 15 minutes for your skin to absorb the sunscreen and protect you. If you wait until you are in the sun to apply sunscreen, your skin is unprotected and can burn.
Use enough sunscreen. Most adults need at least one ounce of sunscreen, about the amount you can hold in your palm, to fully cover all exposed areas of your body. Rub the sunscreen thoroughly into your skin.

Apply sunscreen to all bare skin. Remember your neck, face, ears, tops of your feet and legs. For hard‐to‐reach areas like your back, ask someone to help you or use a spray sunscreen. If you have thinning hair, either apply sunscreen to your scalp or wear a wide‐brimmed hat. To protect your lips, apply a lip balm with a SPF of at least 15.

Reapply sunscreen at least every two hours to remain protected, or immediately after swimming or excessively sweating. People who get sunburned usually didn’t use enough sunscreen, didn’t reapply it after being in the sun, or used an expired product. Your skin is exposed to the sun’s harmful UV rays every time you go outside, even on cloudy days and in the winter. So whether you are on vacation or taking a brisk fall walk in your neighborhood, remember to use sunscreen. For more skin cancer prevention tips, see a board-certified dermatologist.

People who get sunburned usually didn’t use enough sunscreen, didn’t reapply it after being in the sun, or used an expired product.

Your skin is exposed to the sun’s harmful UV rays every time you go outside, even on cloudy days and in the winter. So whether you are on vacation or taking a brisk fall walk in your neighborhood, remember to use sunscreen.

And remember, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. To protect your skin, the American Academy of Dermatology recommends that everyone:

Seek shade when appropriate, remembering that the sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
( I may be one of the only parents who try and adhere to this time frame about 95% of the time. I will not allow my children to swim during this peek time when the suns rays are the strongest. I feel that it is just a better idea to wait until later in the evening to swim or spend extended periods of time in the sun.)

And remember, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. To protect your skin, the American Academy of Dermatology recommends that everyone:

Seek shade when appropriate, remembering that the sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, where possible.
Generously apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 30 to all exposed skin. “Broad-spectrum” provides protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays.

umbrella
Wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, where possible. ( and we are that family that is out at the lake wearing those long sleeved uv protective shirts)
Generously apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 30 to all exposed skin. “Broad-spectrum” provides protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. ( The ZO Skin Health line just came out with a face and body spray spf 50, and water resistant that I’m excited about!) oclipse-sun-spray-spf50

For more skin cancer prevention tips, see a board-certified dermatologist.

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Read MoreMay 5, 2015 11:11 pm - Posted by Stephanie

skin of color

I strongly recommend using a sunblock that contains Zinc Oxide. The challenge with Zinc Oxide is that it is very thick and white and not appealing for daily use. There are many products that offer a micronized Zinc, however on dark skin it still leaves a white cast on the skin. Skin Ceuticals created a sunblock that contains a transparent Titanium Dioxide and Zinc Oxide. The Sheer Physical UV Defense is more like a liquid than a cream, this sunblock is so sheer that it will not show even on dark skin.

sunblock

Sheer Physical UV Defense SPF 50®
A groundbreaking first-to-market mattifying fluid with transparent finish, this paraben-free, all-physical filter sunscreen provides increased protection in an ultra-sheer texture for all skin types, even very sensitive. Sheer Physical UV Defense SPF 50® offers the photoprotection of trusted broad-spectrum, physical filters, zinc oxide (Z-COTE®) and titanium dioxide, and is enhanced by artemia salina, a plankton extract, to increase the skin’s defenses and resistance to UV and heat stress.

The unique ‘shake then apply’ action assures even distribution of active ingredients in this silky sheer fluid that dries quickly and leaves no residue.

Thank You for visiting Best of Both Worlds Az.
You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and on our blog site
www.bestofbothworldsaz.com

Read MoreJanuary 30, 2011 4:23 pm - Posted by Kristy

rosacea treatments

Rosacea is primarily a facial vascular disorder in which blood vessels are functionally and structurally abnormal. Currently rosacea can’t be cured, however it can be effectively treated and controlled. Rosacea is a progressive skin disorder, that should be treated when symptoms first begin. Treatment should be aimed at treating the underlying vascular issues associated with rosacea. Vascular Lasers and IPL treatments are extremely effective at treating existing redness and broken blood vessels. In addition to avoiding rosacea triggers, topical products can be used to prevent flushing and further damage that can accelerate the progression of the disorder.

[Rosacea 101: Understanding Rosacea and it’s triggers]

Laser and IPL Therapy

Both Laser and IPL therapy are very effective at treating telangiectasia (broken blood vessels), generalized redness and flushing. IPL therapy can also be enhanced with Levulan to get the added benefit of treating acne, rosacea papules and pustuals.

Laser

Lasers that are absorbed well by hemoglobin are used to treat vascular concerns. The laser energy is absorbed by the blood vessel and creates heat within the vessel which damages the vessel wall and permenatly closes that vessel. The treated vessels are then absorbed by the body. Although there isn’t a cure for rosacea, studies show that laser treatment can permantly remove damaged facial blood vessels and with repeated treatment blood vessels will not always be created to replace the old vessel. Facial blood vessels treated with lasers are sometimes replaced with connective tissue. This is good news, because this will permently reduce the number of blood vessels in the face, near to the level of vessels found in healthy skin.

Lasers have a single wavelength that work at a very specific depth. So any idividual laser has it’s limitations. KTP 532 nm and Pulsed Dye: 577 -585nm lasers are well absorbed by hemoglobin and are very effective at treating superfical blood vessels in the face, while Nd:YAG 1064nm lasers are also well absorbed by hemoglobin, they are effective at treating vessels that are located deeper in the skin.

[ Lasers 101: Learn more about aesthetic lasers]

Intese Pulsed Light (IPL)

IPL skin treatments are known by many names including Fotofacial, Photofacial, Photoderm and Photo rejuvenation. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) differs from lasers because IPL uses a wide spectrum of wavelengths at the same time (for example: 500nm — 1200nm) that can target any chromophore in that range, while lasers have a single wavelength. You can think of the laser like a sniper that can precisely hit a single target with one shot, and IPL is like a grenade that hits several targets at once. IPL uses special cut-off filters that can be selected to target chromophors in a certain range within the skin. When treating rosacea or any vascular concern, the intended target is hemoglobin. The advantage IPL treatments have over laser treatments is that IPL can target vessels at different depths.

[ Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) 101: Learn more about IPL treatments]

Combined Laser and IPL Therapy

Best results are achieved when you combine IPL and Laser treatments. IPL and Laser treatments can be done independently, however combining technologies at the same treatment time will provide a better result. This type of treatment is fairly aggressive and should only be done by someone that is very experienced in combining these technologies.

Oral and Topical Products

Topical Metronidazole Gel

Metronidazole is topical agent used to treat rosacea, available only by prescription. The primary action of Metronidazole is anti-inflamatory. Metronidazole is effective at reducing papules and pustules and has a fairly minimal effect at reducing inflammation. Unfortunately, it isn’t effective for treating broken blood vessels or flushing.

Antibiotics

Antibiotics have long been used to treat rosacea, however they work primarily through their anti-inflammatory properties rather than antibacterial. Antibiotics are effective at reducing papules, pustules, and inflammation. The limitation with antibiotics is that they are not effective at treating telangiectasia or flushing.

Antihistamines

Antihistamines are effective at reducing facial inflammation, swelling and burning associated with rosacea. Histamine contributes to swelling, itching and burning. Histamine has also been shown to play a role in inflammation and redness.

Sunblock with Zinc Oxide

UV rays can penetrate the skin and activate sensory nerves that release potent vasodilators, as well as creating heat in the skin causing facial flushing. Zinc oxide reflects both UVA and UVB rays, blocking out heat from the sun. Topical zinc oxide also has significant healing properties when applied to damaged skin and has been shown to decrease inflammation in both the epidermis and dermis.

Dimethicone

Dimethicone is a silicone based ingredient with moisturizing ability. Dimethicone is also a protective ingredient that has been shown to reduce flushing caused by skin irritants.

Antioxidants

Free radicals have been shown to cause structural damage to vascular walls and many free radicals are potent blood vessel dilators. Dietary and topical antioxidants help to block the damaging effects of free radicals.

[Topical Antioxidants}

Studies show that vitamin C can protect blood vessel walls from free radical damage and reverse existing vascular damage. People with rosacea should get plenty of vitamin-C in their diet, and may want to consider a vitamin-C supplement. In addition to being a great antioxidant, topical vitamin-C has anti-inflammatory qualities.

*This post is intended for informational purposes only.

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Read MoreJanuary 18, 2011 1:40 pm - Posted by Kristy

School is back in session but summer is definitely not over. Wearing sunblock every day is just as important in the winter and on cloudy days as it is in the summer and its not just for those planning to be in the sun all day. Those who simply drive to work and work indoors should still apply sunblock everyday. Driving to work is enough sun exposure to activate melanocytes and compromise skin pre and post procedures, such as Fotofacial, Chemical Peels, Laser Hair Removal, Fraxel, and Microlaser Peel. When UVA and UVB light rays enter the skin, they damage the skin cells, causing visible and invisible damage. The cell damage adds up year after year. Built up “invisible” sun damage can lead to skin cancer. The sun breaks down collagen resulting in premature aging, uneven skin tone, freckles, sun spots, and skin cancer. The best way to prevent those unwanted effects from the sun, is to stay out of it, especially between 10am and 4pm, when the suns rays are the strongest.

It is very important to limit sun exposure in childhood, as most of sun damage is done in the first 18 years of life. Start preventing sun damage in childhood now. Block the sun by applying a broad-spectrum UVA and UVB sunscreen lotion with SPF 30 or higher and reapply at least every hour. I prefer chemical-free sunscreens that contain zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, they are more opaque and prevent light from entering the skin. I like the Coppertone Sensitive Skin SPF 50, it has 14% zinc oxide and no fragrance, for the body. I like the Obagi Healthy Skin SPF 35 and Skin Ceuticals Sheer Physical UV Defense SPF 50 for the face. Make sure to apply sun block generously to the skin, and apply 30 minutes before going in the sun. In addition to sunblock, wear sunglasses, protective hats, and protective clothing and stay in the shade as much as possible.


You can find Coopertone Pure and Simple at most drug stores.

You can get Obagi Healthy Skin, SPF 35 and Skin Ceuticals Sheer Physical UV Defense SPF 50 at Paradise Valley Skin Klinic.
Paradise Valley Skin Klinic logo

Paradise Valley Skin Klinic offers a wide variety of professional skin treatments and products.
Call to schedule a treatment or consultation. 480 421-1701
www.shapiroplastic surgery.com

You can follow Paradise Valley Skin Klinic on facebook.

Thank you for visiting Best of Both Worlds Az.
You can follow us on facebook, twitter and on our blog site.
www.bestofbothworldsaz.com

Read MoreAugust 31, 2010 2:13 pm - Posted by Stephanie